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    Our current strategic audit plan details audits we plan to conduct for 2018 to 2021.

The Queensland Audit Office

The Queensland Audit Office is the independent auditor of the Queensland public sector.

We conduct financial audits and performance audits to provide public confidence in the reliability of public sector entity financial statements and operating performance. Through our audit work, we make recommendations that promote accountability and transparency in government, and improvements in service efficiency and effectiveness. We take a constructive approach to how we engage with our clients.

Our unique position provides us with visibility across the entire public sector of matters impacting financial performance and our audit mandate provides us with access to the information we need to develop an evidence-based understanding of operating performance.

Our vision is for better public services for Queenslanders. We strive to use our unique position and mandate to achieve this vision.

Latest Reports

We produce reports that contain the results of our financial audits and performance audits.

Reports on the results of our financial audits provide information beyond the individual audit opinions about the key themes impacting sectors as well as factors impacting the financial sustainability of the Queensland Government.

Reports on the results of our performance audits focus on topics of importance to Queensland, examining whether government services have been delivered in a way that is efficient. effective and complying with relevant requirements.

These reports are tabled in parliament and are accessible to all members of the public.

Audits in progress

This section is about our performance audit program for 2018-21.

We apply a strategic audit planning approach in choosing our audit topics. This involves assessing the challenges, risks, and opportunities facing the public sector, local governments and the community. 

Our legislation—the Auditor-General Act 2009 (our Act)—requires us to prepare a strategic audit plan of the performance audits we propose to conduct over the coming three years.  We update our plan annually, based on our current understanding of the public sector in Queensland.  

2019-20

Educating for the digital future

In 2008, the Australian Government promoted teaching and learning with the use of technologies through its Digital Education Revolution national partnership agreement. This partnership agreement provided over $2 billion in funding to the Australian states and territories to provide computers and software to all students in school Years 9 to 12, deliver digital learning resources, and provide professional development in information and communication technology (ICT) for teachers.

In Queensland, the Department of Education implemented initiatives to support learning with technology. These included ‘bring your own digital device’ to school for learning purposes, computers for teachers, access to ICT courses for students and teachers, digital practice guides, and the creation of ‘the learning place’ (the department’s secure eLearning environment).

Audit objective

This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is achieving its objectives in implementing a smart classroom and digital strategy to support learning in a digital world.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Education, Employment and Small Business Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Establishing effective audit committees

Audit committees are an important part of the governance framework of public sector entities. They are mandatory for all government departments and are encouraged for other public sector entities.

Audit committees provide independent assurance and advice to accountable officers and boards. To provide assurance they require:

  • a documented charter that identifies the committee's responsibilities
  • individuals with the right combination of skills and experience
  • a sound working relationship with the accountable office or board and the entity.

Audit committees are also responsible for monitoring the implementation of recommendations made by audits and other review activities and ensuring the coverage of audits is aligned with the entity’s risks.
 

Audit objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the audit committees of public sector entities.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Asset management in local government

Asset management is critical to the long-term financial sustainability of the local government sector. Without full knowledge of the type, performance, cost, and age of their assets, councils are limited in their ability to make fully informed decisions about their asset renewal, maintenance and replacement.

As at 30 June 2017, councils were responsible for $87 billion worth of infrastructure assets, including roads and bridges, buildings, water supply and sewerage networks, and stormwater drainage. At that time, only 43 per cent of Queensland councils had up-to- date asset management plans.

During 2016–17, the local government sector spent $1.4 billion on the renewal of infrastructure assets. It is important that councils implement and practise sound asset management principles, so they can provide the best level of service to their communities.

Audit objective

This audit will assess if councils are effectively managing their infrastructure assets to maximise their service potential while minimising the total cost of ownership. 

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Maintaining ecologically sustainable communities

The ongoing prosperity of Queensland communities requires careful planning and management. Sustainable practices that enable economic growth without compromising the state’s natural environment is necessary.

Local councils are responsible for managing land, energy and water resources while also ensuring social and economic vitality. Sustainably managing these resources, amidst population growth, resource limitations and climate change, is a significant challenge for councils.

Councils require long-term social and environmental strategies to respond to these challenges and build positive outcomes to sustain Queensland communities.

Audit objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness and economy of local council’s social and environmental sustainability strategies. 

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Healthcare pathways (waitlist management)

Public patients are referred to specialists from emergency departments or by their general practitioner. Hospital and Health Services develop guidelines which help the referring doctors decide to whom they will refer patients and ensure the doctors provide appropriate information.

Long surgical and outpatient waiting times and inappropriate referrals to specialist medical appointments can contribute to sub-optimal outcomes for patients. As at 1 January 2017, the Department of Health reported 190 158 patients were waiting for a specialist outpatient appointment. Patients waiting longer than clinically recommended periods of time varied between two and 56 per cent depending on the specialty.

The Department of Health establishes outpatient waiting times as an important performance measure in their service agreements with the Hospital and Health Services and assigns funding for this. The Queensland health sector has several strategies to address specialist outpatient waiting times including the Specialist Outpatient Strategy and the Clinical Prioritisation Criteria program (currently being developed).

Audit objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of strategies that ensure patients receive the most appropriate healthcare treatment within recommended times

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Integrated care approach to chronic disease

Queensland Health’s strategy—Your health, Queensland's future: Advancing health 2026—outlines that cardiovascular disease and cancer are the primary cause of death for Queenslanders. It also explains that improving the integration of care for patients with chronic disease is an important strategy for achieving better outcomes.

The term 'chronic disease' refers to a group of diseases that tend to be long-lasting and have persistent effects. They account for 88 per cent of the burden of disease and 91 per cent of all deaths.

Chronic disease costs $45.8 billion nationally, or 87 per cent of recurrent allocated health expenditure, and up to $5 billion per year in Queensland. It can also have a significant impact on work productivity.

The Australian Government, the state and territory governments, and primary care providers share the management of chronic disease. Integrated care aims to improve patient experience by better coordinating an individual’s care across primary and preventative care, mental health, and specialist and hospital care. Service providers must tailor the delivery of integrated care to the specific needs of children, adolescents, adults and those in aged care. Better coordination of care is also required to avoid unnecessary services and hospitalisations, thereby reducing costs. The Queensland Government has developed a $35 million integrated care innovation fund for integrated care projects.

Audit objective

This audit will assess how effectively and efficiently Queensland Health is managing integrated care of chronic disease, including how it works with primary health networks and general practitioners.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Preventing and responding to domestic and family violence

On 10 September 2014, the Special Taskforce on Domestic and Family Violence in Queensland was established. In February 2015, the taskforce finalised its report, Not now, Not ever: Putting an end to domestic and family violence in Queensland. The taskforce reports that domestic violence in Queensland has continued to increase and is costing the state’s economy between $2.7 and $3.2 billion annually.

In its subsequent budgets, the Queensland Government committed to an overall funding package of $323.1 million over six years to respond to the issues and recommendations in the Not now, Not ever: Putting an end to domestic and family violence in Queensland report.

Audit objective

This audit will examine how effective public sector initiatives have been in preventing and responding to domestic and family violence. 

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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2020-21

Managing conflicts of interest

A conflict of interest may occur when there is a real or perceived conflict between private interests and public duty. Undeclared conflicts present a significant fraud risk, particularly within local government. Mismanagement of conflicts of interest can damage a council’s reputation and ability to deliver services.

In 2016–17 the Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) examined how 13 councils had dealt with allegations of conflicts of interest and the adequacy of their conflict of interest systems.

In October 2017, the CCC released its report about ‘Managing and responding to conflicts of interest involving council employees’. It recommended 10 councils implement an overarching framework to enable them to apply a coordinated approach to identify, manage and monitor conflicts of interest.

Audit objective

This audit will assess how effectively councils manage and respond to conflicts of interest.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Preventing childhood obesity

The health of Queenslanders 2016 report states that 19 per cent of children in Queensland are overweight and a further seven per cent are obese. This rate has not changed since 2007–08. The rate of childhood obesity 30 years ago was two per cent.

Childhood obesity can have a range of adverse consequences including social discrimination, poor self-esteem, depression, and childhood type 2 diabetes. In the longer term, obese children have a higher likelihood of adult health problems such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some forms of cancer, and joint problems.

These consequences can cause significant individual morbidity and mortality, lost productivity, and increased direct health care costs.

Your health, Queensland's future: Advancing health 2026 is a 10-year vision and strategy for the Queensland health system. It was released in 2016. One headline measure of the strategy’s success is reducing childhood obesity by 10 per cent by 2026. The Department of Health in its Overweight and obesity prevention strategy 2017 to 2020 details actions and targets for addressing the prevalence of childhood obesity.

In addition, schools deliver specific education initiatives to ensure children and families are aware of how to eat healthily and are aware of the importance of nutrition and weight in the context of overall health. Many variables can contribute to childhood obesity outcomes.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether the Department of Health and the Department of Education are effectively implementing strategies to prevent and reduce childhood obesity.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
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Mental health service delivery

Queensland spends over $930 million annually on state-funded mental health services. Each year, one in five adults experience a mental disorder, and approximately half experience a mental disorder at some point in their lives.

Connecting care to recovery 2016–2021 is a five-year plan that sets the direction for, and highlights priorities for, action and investment across the state-funded mental health, alcohol and other drug service system. The plan aims to deliver earlier and more effective and integrated responses, improved partnerships and collaboration, use workforces more effectively and increase system performance.

The most efficient and effective place for a patient to be supported in their ongoing recovery from an episode of mental ill-health is in their community. For a successful recovery, patients require access to the right services, in the right place and at the right time.

Audit objective

This audit will assess Queensland Health’s effectiveness in designing, implementing and evaluating its Connecting care to recovery 2016–2021 plan for mental health, alcohol and drug services.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population faces considerable disadvantage in health and wellbeing compared to the non-Indigenous population. The Productivity Commission estimates $1.67 billion was spent on indigenous health services in Queensland in 2015–16.

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) committed to closing the gap in indigenous life expectancy by 2033 and halving the gap in mortality rates for indigenous children under five by 2018.

To improve indigenous health care, Queensland Health is implementing the Making Tracks Investment Strategy 2015–2018. The strategy outlines the various initiatives intended to reduce the health gap and focuses on:

  • a healthy and safe start to life
  • reducing risk factors
  • improving living environments
  • earlier diagnosis and treatment
  • cultural competence
  • the community-controlled health sector
  • research, accountability and evaluation.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether Queensland Health is reducing the gap in health and wellbeing outcomes for Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Health, Communities, Disability Services and Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Transport service contracts

Transport Service Contracts are negotiated on an efficient price basis for purchasing rail, bus and ferry services from operators and infrastructure managers, on behalf of government.

The benefits of transport service contracts are that they:

  • provide a flexible, accountable and transparent mechanism for the government to satisfy its transport and related policy objectives;
  • enable the government to identify the minimum level and minimum standard of services it requires to be provided;
  • enable government to determine whether the level of funding for these services is providing the best value for money from an overall transport policy perspective.

Transport service contracts exist for rail services (Queensland Rail’s Citytrain, Traveltrain and rail Infrastructure services), regional freight, and livestock services (Aurizon’s rail and road freight and rail cattle train services). Service contracts also exist between the Department of Transport and Main Roads and bus and ferry operators across the state.
 

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether transport service contracts are managed effectively to meet the government’s transport objectives, maximise value for money and meet community needs.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Transport and Public Works Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

One-stop shop plan

In November 2013, the former Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation released its One-Stop Shop plan 2013–18. Responsibility for the One-Stop Shop plan and its implementation transitioned to the Department of Housing and Public Works in December 2017.

The One-Stop Shop plan intends to deliver simpler and easier access to government services, including:

  • delivering more services online
  • making services and information simpler, clearer and faster to access
  • joining up services across government boundaries
  • reducing the cost of services.

The government has allocated approximately $72 million to fund the One-Stop Shop plan. Assessing whether the One-Stop Shop plan has delivered its intended outcomes and provided value for money is particularly necessary, as Queensland seeks to be a leader in digital government.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether the Queensland Government’s One-Stop Shop plan has delivered its intended outcomes.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Transport and Public Works Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Deploying police resources

The Queensland Police Service has over 13 000 operational staff and 14 000 total staff. It is responsible for providing policing services to more than 4.9 million Queenslanders, who are spread over more than 1.7 million square kilometres.

Deploying police resources efficiently and effectively means using the most appropriate types and number of resources in the right place at the right time to maximise public safety outcomes.

Two objectives that the Queensland Police Service commits to in its 2017–21 Strategic Plan are to make the community safer and equip its workforce for the future.

Audit objective

This audit will examine how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Police Service deploys its resources to maximise public safety.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Legal Affairs and Community Safety Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Managing demand across the criminal justice system

Queensland’s criminal justice system is under increasing pressure, as evidenced by congested police watch houses, a growing backlog in court cases and overcrowded prisons.

Between 2012 and 2017 the number of unsentenced prisoners in Queensland increased by more than double. Within this same period, the number of sentenced prisoners increased by 32 per cent.

Identifying the pressure points across Queensland’s justice system, and the specific drivers increasing demand, is necessary to manage the systems future demand.

Managing demand across the justice system requires an integrated and coordinated approach by criminal justice entities.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether criminal justice entities are efficiently and effectively managing demand across Queensland’s justice system.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Legal Affairs and Community Safety Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Capital asset management and planning

The annual budget cycle of the Queensland Government includes a Capital Statement. This statement presents an overview of proposed capital outlays by each Queensland Government department each year, as well as a summary of the government’s approach to infrastructure provision. Capital outlays are broken down into capital purchases (including acquisitions under finance leases) and capital grants.

The level of capital expenditure over the 2017–18 forward estimates is forecast to exceed $42 billion, with growth largely attributable to additional infrastructure investment associated with the state infrastructure fund.

Historically, Queensland Government agencies have been unable to spend the approved capital funds in the budget period. This increases the risk of government assets not being able to effectively support the delivery of key social services, or to support the state’s development, the needs of local communities, and local employment opportunities.

The state’s budget sector has underspent its capital program by more than $7.7 billion (14 per cent) over the last five financial years.

Audit objective

This audit will assess how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Government estimates and delivers its capital programs.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

State Development, Natural Resources and Agricultural Industry Development Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Monitoring environmental conditions for mining activities

When entities wish to undertake activities in Queensland that have the potential to contaminate the environment, they require an environmental authority. Environmentally relevant activities (ERAs) are industrial, resource, or intensive agricultural activities that have the potential to release contaminants into the environment. Environmental authorities include eligibility criteria, which ensure that environmental risks relating to ERA operations are suitably managed under standard conditions or minimum operating requirements.

The Department of Environment and Science is the administering authority, under the Environmental Protection Act 1994. It approves eligibility criteria and standard conditions for ERAs.

For example, on 2 February 2016, the Department of Environment and Science issued a final environmental authority for Adani’s proposed Carmichael Mine project with approximately 140 conditions. This included nine conditions relating to the black-throated finch, as required by the Land Court. The department will need to monitor any potential environmental impacts arising from this project.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether the Department of Environment and Science is effectively monitoring and managing the environmental conditions for the state’s mining activities.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

State Development, Natural Resources and Agricultural Industry Development Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Managing oil and chemical spills

Oil and chemical spill incidents can have devastating effects on the environment. Water- based spills can result in major biological issues, physical contamination, and disruption to industries that rely heavily on waterways for their operations. Recreational activities can also be impacted when spills encroach on beaches and local waterways.

Although land-based spills tend to move more slowly and affect smaller areas, they are still hazardous to people and the environment.

State and federal agencies work together to respond to land and water-based spills. Maritime Safety Queensland (a branch of the Department of Transport and Main Roads) is the lead agency in Queensland for responding to maritime spills, and the Department of Environment and Science provides it with assistance where the spills affect wildlife. The Department of Environment and Science is the lead agency for responding to land- based spills.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether the Department of Environment and Science and Maritime Safety Queensland has effective processes for managing land and water-based oil and chemical spills.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

State Development, Natural Resources and Agricultural Industry Development Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Managing tourism and sustainability of Queensland’s World Heritage sites

Queensland is the fortunate custodian of five world heritage listed sites: the Great Barrier Reef, Fraser Island, the Wet Tropics, Goondwana Rainforests, and the Riversleigh World Heritage site. These sites are not only unique and naturally beautiful but also environmentally sensitive.

Queensland is Australia’s second largest tourism market after New South Wales, accounting for 24.6 per cent of the national tourism output and employing around 130 900 people. Our world heritage sites are a cornerstone of the tourism industry, some attracting increasing numbers of visitors.

Sustainably managing the tourism and environmental priorities of these sites presents significant challenges for the responsible public sector agencies. While considerable national and international attention has been given to the management of, and risks to, the Great Barrier Reef, considerably less public attention has been given to our four other world heritage sites.

The Department of Environment and Science is responsible for protecting these sites. Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service is responsible for the day-to-day management of the sites, while promoting tourism is managed by a range of public sector agencies. In 2016, Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (then a unit in the former Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing) released the Government’s Ecotourism Plan 2016–20.
 

Audit objective

This audit will examine how effectively the state’s tourism and environmental agencies are managing tourism and environmental priorities for Queensland’s world heritage listed sites.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

State Development, Natural Resources and Agricultural Industry Development Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Commonwealth Games legacy

The Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games will be the fifth time Australia has hosted the Commonwealth Games. The 11-day sporting and cultural event involves athletes and officials from 70 nations and territories.

With a budget of approximately $2 billion, the Commonwealth Games relies on significant public and private investment.

Beyond the 11-day sporting event, the Commonwealth Games has the potential to provide long-term economic, industry, social and community benefits to Queensland.

In December 2014, in our report 2018 Commonwealth Games: Progress (Report 9: 2014–15) we recommended that the Office of the Commonwealth Games Coordination complete its legacy evaluation framework, including measures and targets to evaluate realisation of legacy benefits.

The Queensland Government subsequently finalised and implemented the ‘Embracing 2018 Legacy Program’. The programs legacy benefits include:

  • delivering GC2018: The Inspiring Games
  • enduring jobs and powering economic growth
  • accelerating the Gold Coast to a world-class boutique city
  • building active, engaged and inclusive communities.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether the intended legacy benefits from the 2018 Commonwealth Games have been realised by the state.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

State Development, Natural Resources and Agricultural Industry Development Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Collecting state revenue

Responsibility for managing taxation and royalties within Queensland Treasury rests with the Office of State Revenue. For the 2016–17 financial year, Queensland Treasury recognised revenue of over $10.6 billion from taxation and over $3.8 billion from royalties.

Revenue from taxation and royalties represents approximately 30 per cent of total revenue for the general government sector and 25 per cent of total revenue for the total state sector (which includes the general government sector). Amounts collected from taxation and royalties can vary from year to year due to external factors that the government cannot directly control.

Taxation revenue includes transfer duties, payroll tax, land tax, and gaming taxes. Royalties are charges for natural resources such as coal, petroleum, and liquefied natural gas extracted and sold by the private sector.

To collect state revenue, the Office of State Revenue uses the principles of behavioural economics to determine the best way to help people comply with their state tax obligations.

Audit objective

This audit will assess how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Government collects taxes and royalties.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Open data

In 2012, the Premier announced the government’s ‘Open Data Reform’ initiative with the aim of making government data more accessible for the community.

The former Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation was responsible for the overall initiative, with government agencies and statutory bodies responsible for developing their own open data strategies. In December 2017, responsibility for the initiative transferred to the Department of Housing and Public Works.

Open data strategies aim to stimulate the economy by encouraging Queenslanders to develop innovative new services and solutions for the state. These strategies also feed into the Advance Queensland agenda. The government designed this agenda to drive innovation and create opportunities for entrepreneur, industry, and government collaboration to turn ideas into commercial products and into businesses that create jobs.

Without effective open data strategies, public funds might be wasted, users might not be able to access data, or data might not meet user needs. There is the potential for lost opportunities for innovation and economic development.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether open data strategies have achieved their full potential in terms of adding value to the Queensland public sector, the economy, and the community. 

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Transport and Public Works Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Development applications and approvals

Over the past few years, there have been several changes to the legislative framework that underpins the development application and approval process.

These changes can contribute to increased risk and complexity in how applications are processed. Further complexity arises from other factors including changing regulatory instruments, local versus state government requirements, and the nature of the application itself.

Depending on the development, the application may be assessed by either the local government or the state government.

Queensland has recently reviewed and updated its planning legislation, with the revised State Planning Policy taking effect from 3 July 2017.

Audit objective

This audit will assess whether local governments’ processes for development applications and approvals are timely, efficient, and effective, and comply with relevant regulatory requirements.

Who we might audit

To be advised.

Parliamentary committee

Economics and Governance Committee

Audit status

Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contribute Now

Careers

As an integrity office, we provide independent, professional audit services to public sector entities on behalf of the Parliament and Queenslanders.

Our values are vitally important to how we work  – we engage with purpose, we challenge ourselves, we deliver on our commitments, and we care about people. We are uniquely positioned to operate across the entire Queensland public sector for the public good.

As part of our strategy, we invest in our people to be the best in their field and have a specialist graduate program with opportunities in the areas of financial audit, performance audit and information systems audit. As a QAO team member, you are offered professional training, personalised development and great career opportunities.

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