Reports to parliament

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We produce reports to promote accountability and transparency in government. Our reports are tabled in parliament and contain the results of our financial and performance audits.

All of the reports we table are also available on the Queensland Parliament website. Please visit their website or contact us if you would like access to an earlier report.

Delivering coronial services

(Report 6: 2018–19)

Health
Community Services

Queensland coroners are responsible for investigating deaths that occur in Queensland under certain circumstances. Their primary responsibility is to make formal findings in respect of the death, including the circumstances and cause of the death.

Between 2011–12 and 2017–18, the number of deaths reported to the coroner each year for investigation increased by 27 per cent. Demand for Queensland's coronial services is likely to increase with the state’s growing and ageing population.

An effective and efficient coronial system will enable a coroner to provide timely and reliable answers. However, Queensland’s coronial system is complex, and coroners rely on the services of multiple public sector and contracted agencies across a geographically dispersed state.

Follow-up of Bushfire prevention and preparedness

(Report 5: 2018–19)

Community Services
Local Government
Energy and Natural Resources

Australia experiences many large, devastating natural disasters, including catastrophic bushfires. Since 1901, over 700 civilians and 90 firefighters have lost their lives, and over 11 000 homes have been destroyed, in bushfires across Australia.

Queensland's bushfire threat is not as acute as in Australia's southern states. However, current research indicates bushfire seasons will lengthen in the coming decade and fire frequency and intensity may increase.

Managing transfers in pharmacy ownership

(Report 4: 2018-19)

Health

Community pharmacies provide services to over 4.9 million people in Queensland, and in 2017-18 dispensed over 39.3 million medicine items under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

In Queensland, only a pharmacist or an entity owned by a pharmacist can own a pharmacy business. The government regulates this by limiting:

  • ownership of pharmacies to pharmacists or a combination of pharmacists and their relatives only
  • the number of pharmacies each pharmacist or entity can own
  • the control of pharmacies to pharmacists only.

Between 1 January 2016 and 31 July 2018, 316 pharmacies changed ownership in Queensland. 

Delivering shared corporate services in Queensland

(Report 3: 2018-19)

Education and Housing
Central Agencies and Financial Services
Health
Water and Infrastructure
Community Services
Local Government
Energy and Natural Resources

Shared service providers typically deliver processes that can be centralised, standardised, and automated. They aim to achieve efficiencies by simplifying processes or building expertise that means services can be delivered with less resources than its customers could do individually. Some examples of services that are often shared are finance, procurement, human resources, and technology processes.

There are at least seven formal shared service providers for corporate services in Queensland today. And there is a growing number of tasks which are being automated, which significantly impacts roles and occupations across government.

Access to the National Disability Insurance Scheme for people with impaired decision-making capacity

(Report 2: 2018-19)

Health

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is one of the largest public policy reforms ever implemented in Australia. It gives people with disability greater choice and control over the supports they can access in their NDIS plan, and over who provides them. Some people with disability may need help accessing the NDIS.

The is the second report on the NDIS. We tabled National Disability Insurance Scheme (Report 14: 2017018) on 3 May 2018.

Monitoring and managing ICT projects

(Report 1: 2018–19)

Education and Housing
Central Agencies and Financial Services
Health
Water and Infrastructure
Community Services
Local Government
Energy and Natural Resources

The Queensland Government plans to spend $2.6 billion on information and communication technology (ICT) projects over the next four years.

Each department is accountable for making investment decisions, and monitoring and delivering on its investments. Departments provide high-level overviews and status updates of major ICT investments through the ICT dashboard. This dashboard is intended to make information easily accessible, visible, and available for the public to use in a timely manner, and make it easier to identify underperforming projects and focus action on the projects that need it most.

 

Managing local government rates and charges

(Report 17: 2017–18)

Local Government

Queensland’s 77 councils provide services to nearly five million people. In 2016–17, these councils generated more than $6.2 billion revenue in rates and levies. For many councils, rates, levies, fees and charges are their main source of revenue other than Queensland and Australian Government grant funding.

The objective of this audit was to examine whether councils set and administer rates and charges appropriately to support long-term financial sustainability.

We assessed whether a selection of councils:

  • have robust and transparent processes for setting rates and charges
  • have revenue policies and statements that meet legislative requirements
  • effectively administer rates and charges according to legislation and better practice.

This report is the second in a series of performance audits on the financial sustainability of the local government sector. Future audits will assess other aspects of financial sustainability, including costs and expenses and asset management.

Follow-up of Managing water quality in Great Barrier Reef catchments

(Report 16: 2017–18)

Water and Infrastructure
Community Services
Energy and Natural Resources

The Great Barrier Reef is vulnerable to threats that the Queensland Government cannot control or influence, such as extreme weather events. But it can influence other threats, such as the quality of water entering the reef from adjacent catchments—specifically agricultural run-off.

Scientific evidence shows that climate change is the single biggest threat to the reef. However, a major cause of the current poor state of many of the reef's coastal and marine ecosystems is the decline of marine water quality associated with land-based run-off from adjacent catchments. Improving the quality of water flowing from the land to the reef is a critical contributor to the reef's health and, therefore, its ability to withstand and recover from climate change events. 

Education: 2016–17 results of financial audits

(Report 15: 2017–18)

Education and Housing

Entities within the Queensland public education sector intend to deliver world class education and training services. Collectively, the sector aims to help individuals make positive transitions from early childhood through to all stages of schooling, providing them with the knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. This sector provides a variety of services and uses substantial resources to deliver these services.

The education sector, for the purposes of this report, includes the Department of Education, TAFE Queensland, the seven Queensland public universities and the entities they control, the eight Queensland grammar schools, and other statutory bodies and controlled entities that provide specific and specialised education services.

The National Disability Insurance Scheme

(Report 14: 2017–18)

Health
Community Services

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is transforming the way Australians with disability obtain support services. It is a major national reform, jointly governed and funded through a partnership between the Commonwealth and the state and territory governments.

The NDIS intends to give people choice and control over the supports they need, including the ability to manage their own funding if they wish.

It is changing the way disability support services are delivered, as well as government services such as education, health, housing, justice and transport services.

This audit assessed how effectively the Queensland Government is managing the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme and how well prepared it is to oversee services after the transition.

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