This section is about our Forward work plan 2021–24 and the status of audits that are in progress.

Our independent assurance helps parliament, the community and other stakeholders understand whether public sector entities and local governments are delivering their services effectively, efficiency, economically, and in accordance with legislative requirements.

Our insights and recommendations help entities improve their financial management and service delivery.

To ensure we select audit topics that matter most to Queensland, we apply a strategic planning approach. This involves assessing the critical risks and issues facing public service delivery and aligning our planned audit activity in response.

We prepare a forward work plan three years ahead to ensure transparency around our work. We review the plan annually to ensure the we focus on the right topics and conduct them at the right time.

Sometimes, new audits are added after our plan is published. We reflect these changes in the table below throughout the year.

We welcome your suggestions for potential audit topics and your contributions to any audits in progress.

View prior year strategic audit plans here

2021–22

This audit will set out information on how the Department of Education is achieving its objectives to securely and reliably connect learners, teachers and staff to the digital resources and online content that they need. The focus will be on two pillars of the department’s strategy—enhanced collaboration and digital enablement.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is achieving its objectives in implementing a digital strategy to support learning in a digital world.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Tabled
20 July 2021

This follow-up audit will assess whether the Department of Health and hospital and health services have effectively implemented the recommendations made in Emergency department performance reporting (Report 3: 2014–15) and are effectively managing emergency length of stay (ELOS) and patient off stretcher time (POST) performance.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
14 September 2021

The Queensland Government is committed to increasing its use of renewable energy and reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. This audit will examine how the state is managing Queensland’s planned transition to 50 per cent renewable energy by 2030. It will consider the energy initiatives the state government has implemented and the initiatives it plans to implement in the coming years. It will also consider the risks to achieving the 50 per cent target.

Audit Objective

This report will identify the facts relating to the government’s framework for transitioning to meet its renewable energy targets.

Who we might audit

Department of Energy and Public Works

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
To be tabled
Anticipated tabling: October 2021

Contracting in many public sector entities involves a significant level of expenditure and resources. The Queensland Government expects to spend $56 billion in infrastructure (such as roads, hospitals, schools, Cross River Rail, and cruise terminals) over the four years to 2024. This audit will examine how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure. We will assess contract management frameworks, guidelines and processes, and how effectively entities apply them.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Education
  • Queensland Corrective Services. 
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022

Since 2015–16, the government has invested $554.75 million in a suite of domestic and family violence initiatives. This audit will examine the government’s progress in funding and implementing domestic and family violence initiatives and assess the effectiveness of its governance of the collective initiatives.

Audit Objective

The audit will report on the government's progress funding and implementing domestic and family violence initiatives and assess the effectiveness of its governance of the collective initiatives.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021
Contributions closed

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries administers the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001. This legislation gives the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) Queensland powers to deliver animal welfare services. This audit will examine the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries’ engagement with RSPCA Queensland, and how well the department manages that engagement.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries' agreement for RSPCA Queensland to deliver services and exercise powers under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001, and how well the department manages those arrangements.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021
Contributions closed

The owner of a dam is responsible for its safety. Having a dam safety management program in place can minimise the risk of its failure, and the potential impact on human life and property. This audit will provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Audit Objective

The objective of the audit is to provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021
Contributions closed

Government boards play an integral role in setting the strategic direction for an entity, ensuring corporate compliance and management accountability. In many cases, they are responsible for spending taxpayers' money and the custody and control of public assets. This audit will examine the processes entities use to appoint and renew government boards. It will evaluate the current guidelines, and will consider the makeup, diversity, and skill sets of board members.

Audit Objective

The objective of this audit is to assess the processes agencies use to appoint and renew government boards.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads
  • Department of Employment, Small Business and Training
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021

The Queensland Government has invested more than $8 billion to respond to the economic, health and societal impacts of COVID‑19. This audit will examine the impact and effectiveness of public spending during COVID‑19 in maintaining key industries (such as mining, agriculture and tourism) and local economies. The audit may consider whether the funding was targeted to the areas with the most need, and whether spending has reduced or mitigated disruption to the economy.

This audit was previously titled 'COVID-19 economic stimulus spending: early impact'.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022

The Queensland Government is investing $1.6 billion in the Social Housing Construction Jobs Program during 2017–2027. This includes a commitment to deliver 2,972 new social housing homes across the state in the first five years. This audit will examine whether social housing programs are effectively and efficiently meeting the needs of vulnerable Queenslanders.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Communities, Housing and Digital Economy.
Parliamentary Committee
Community Support and Services Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Long waiting times and inappropriate referrals to specialist medical appointments can contribute to sub-optimal outcomes for patients. This audit will examine whether the Department of Health has improved access to specialist outpatient services, including the effectiveness of strategies to increase services where needed, improve equity of access, and ensure patients are seen within recommended times.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021
Contributions closed

Domestic violence is a complex and growing problem that reaches every corner of our society. In our previous audit we looked at the government’s initiatives, funding, and governance for family and domestic violence. This audit will follow on from our previous audit and will examine how effectively public sector entities keep people safe from domestic and family violence and how effectively they rehabilitate perpetrators to reduce the re-occurrence of violence. 

Who we might audit
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022

The Queensland Government established the Queensland Future Fund to reduce state debt. It is a special purpose fund with an estimated funding of $5.6 billion. This audit will examine how the Queensland Future Fund is being established.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Treasury.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021
Contributions closed

Efficient government services are a central part of our vision of better public services for Queenslanders. This audit will examine government administrative spending and will highlight patterns and trends in spending that may represent opportunities for savings. This audit may be followed by a wider review of government procurement.

Who we might audit
  • Selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021

Councils are responsible for maintaining and renewing an asset portfolio of around $112 billion, which they use to deliver community services. This audit will examine whether councils are effectively managing their infrastructure assets to maximise service potential, while minimising the total cost of owning these assets. The audit may consider whether the state government provides councils with appropriate guidance, advice, and templates to use.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Most public sector entities prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Our report summarises the results of audits of Queensland state government entities for each year of this plan, including the 22 government departments. Our 2021 report will analyse the impacts of recent machinery of government changes. We will also follow up audit issues we reported in previous years, including those raised in our report Awarding of sports grants (Report 6: 2020–21).

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021
Contributions closed

State and local government owned water entities provide water throughout Queensland, to households, agriculture, mining, electricity generation, tourism, and manufacturing industries. Our report summarises our financial audit results of Seqwater, Sunwater, Queensland Urban Utilities, Unitywater, Gladstone Area Water Board and Mount Isa Water Board. We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
To be tabled
Anticipated tabling: November 2021

Entities within Queensland's education sector help individuals transition through all stages of schooling, providing knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. Our report summarises our financial audit results for education sector entities, including the Department of Education; the Department of Employment, Small Business and Training; TAFE Queensland; the eight grammar schools; and the seven public universities. We will focus our controls testing on procurement in the 2021 report.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022
Contributions closed

Queensland's local governments are the first line of connection to communities; providing Queenslanders with a wide range of services such as roads, water and waste, libraries, and parks. Our report summarises the audit results of Queensland’s 77 local government entities (councils) and the entities they control.

This report will also include the results of our assessment of councils’ financial statement preparation processes. We will also include focus areas on councils’ use of discretionary funds, managing conflicts of interest, processing and approving development applications, accounting for damage to assets from natural disasters, and continued impacts of COVID‑19.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022
Contributions closed

Each year, the Treasurer prepares consolidated state government financial statements. This report analyses the key financial transactions and balances impacting on the Queensland Government’s financial performance and position. The report also considers the key developments and challenges that may impact on the state’s finances in future financial years.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland's health sector work together to provide a range of healthcare services to Queenslanders and support the wellbeing of Queensland communities. They are currently also at the frontline of the battle against COVID‑19, which brought a wide range of impacts across the sector. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Department of Health and the 16 hospital and health services.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021
Contributions closed

In Queensland, corporations that are owned by the state government generate, transmit, and distribute most of the state’s electricity needs. They aim to ensure an affordable and reliable energy supply to households and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Queensland Government’s energy entities, which include electricity generators (CS Energy and Stanwell), electricity transmission operators (Powerlink), electricity distributors (Energex and Ergon) and retailers (Ergon Energy Queensland). We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland’s transport sector work together to create an integrated transport network, connecting Queensland’s people and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the seven state-owned entities in the sector. These include the Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Rail, Cross River Rail Delivery Authority, and the four port entities. We also plan to examine major developments such as the Smart Ticketing Project and Transport Delivery Contracts.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct–Dec 2021
Contributions closed

This report to parliament on major projects will draw together our financial and performance insights and provide the status of major infrastructure projects of the state and local governments. We will also provide data and analysis of the planning, coordination, and delivery of the state’s capital program.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jan-Mar 2022
Contributions closed

QAO has developed a new process for entities to efficiently and effectively self-assess how they are tracking in implementing the recommendations QAO makes in its performance audit reports to parliament. The results of the self-assessments will be included in a new report to parliament, the first of which is titled Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021.

Who we might audit

The Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021 will include the progress entities have made against QAO recommendations in our reports tabled between 2015–16 and 2017–18. This entails 30 reports, containing 203 performance audit recommendations, made to 54 entities.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021
Contributions closed

2022–23

Deploying police resources efficiently and effectively means using the most appropriate types and number of resources in the right place at the right time. This audit will examine how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Police Service deploys its resources to maximise public safety.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Regions outside of South East Queensland account for approximately one-third of the state’s total economic output and around 28 per cent of the population. They are critical to Queensland’s economy and future. This audit will examine the Queensland Government’s effectiveness in progressing the goals for strong and prosperous regions in its Queensland Plan.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Queensland spends over $930 million annually on state-funded mental health services. Each year, one in five adults experiences a mental disorder. This audit will examine how well Queensland’s state-funded mental health services are meeting the care needs of Queenslanders. The audit may consider the transition of patients from hospital care into community-based care, and the effective alignment of mental health services with those delivered through the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services
  • Queensland Mental Health Commission.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

This audit will examine how different public sector entities managed their workforces during COVID‑19. It will consider how agencies rapidly deployed staff to areas with urgent need. It will also consider the state government’s overall mobility framework, frontline deployment, employee mobilisation, and internal recruitment to temporarily fill non-frontline roles.

Who we might audit
  • Public Service Commission
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

In 2020–21, the Queensland Government plans to spend $14.8 billion to drive the state’s largest infrastructure program in over a decade. This audit will examine how effectively and efficiently public sector entities plan and deliver key infrastructure projects.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Our world heritage sites are a cornerstone of the tourism industry, with some attracting increasing numbers of visitors. Sustainably managing the tourism and environmental priorities of these sites can present significant challenges for the public sector. This audit will how effectively the state’s tourism and environmental entities are managing Queensland’s world heritage listed sites.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Environment and Science
  • Department of Tourism, Innovation and Sport
  • Tourism and Events Queensland
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

The Powering Queensland Plan sets out the Queensland Government's strategy to guide the state through the short-term and long-term challenges facing Australia's energy markets. The government is investing $1.16 billion to ensure Queenslanders can access an affordable and secure supply of energy. This audit will examine whether the state is effectively implementing the Powering Queensland Plan to ensure Queenslanders can access an affordable, secure, and clean supply of energy.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Energy and Public Works.
Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Long-term planning is critical to the productivity, liveability, and sustainability of Queensland’s communities. This audit will examine how effectively the Queensland Government takes long-term perspectives into its planning processes. It may examine the state’s strategic prioritisation process, as well as budget and funding processes. It may also consider how government departments coordinate their plans and activities to achieve outcomes over 10 years or longer.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

The Queensland Ambulance Service provides critical care to Queenslanders. In 2019–20, over a third of the 1.6 million presentations to emergency departments arrived by ambulance. The effective planning, coordination and timely response of ambulance services and emergency departments is paramount to the wellbeing of patients. This audit will examine how effectively and efficiently Queensland Health is addressing root cause issues impacting on ambulance response times.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health (including Queensland Ambulance Service)
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Cyber safety is important for many reasons, including protecting students from online bullying from their peers and from online predators who target children. This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is effectively supporting schools in their protection of students undertaking online activities.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

The Queensland Indigenous population faces considerable disadvantage in health and wellbeing compared to the non-Indigenous population. This audit will examine whether the Department of Health, alongside other entities, is reducing the gap in health outcomes for Queensland Indigenous peoples (including Indigenous children).

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Seniors, Disability Services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Each year, the Queensland Government prepares a state budget identifying estimated revenues and expenses over the next four years. The budget also outlines how the government’s fiscal objectives and strategies will support key initiatives and longer-term objectives identified in key documents such as Queensland’s Economic Recovery Plan and savings and debt plan. This audit will examine how the framework for preparing the state budget supports the government’s identified fiscal principles and seeks to achieve the objectives and measures identified in key economic plans.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Treasury. 
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Entities within Queensland's education sector help individuals transition through all stages of schooling, providing knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. Our report summarises our financial audit results for education sector entities, including the Department of Education; the Department of Employment, Small Business and Training; TAFE Queensland; the eight grammar schools; and the seven public universities.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Queensland's local governments are the first line of connection to communities; providing Queenslanders with a wide range of services such as roads, water and waste, libraries, and parks. Our report summarises the audit results of Queensland’s 77 local government entities (councils) and the entities they control.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Each year, the Treasurer prepares consolidated state government financial statements. This report analyses the key financial transactions and balances impacting on the Queensland Government’s financial performance and position. The report also considers the key developments and challenges that may impact on the state’s finances in future financial years.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Most public sector entities prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Our report summarises the results of audits of Queensland state government entities for each year of this plan, including the 22 government departments.

From 2022, we will include the results of our annual assessment of internal controls and the rotational focus on grants management, significant procurement activity, change management, and information systems.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland's health sector work together to provide a range of healthcare services to Queenslanders and support the wellbeing of Queensland communities. They are currently also at the frontline of the battle against COVID‑19, which brought a wide range of impacts across the sector. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Department of Health and the 16 hospital and health services.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

In Queensland, corporations that are owned by the state government generate, transmit, and distribute most of the state’s electricity needs. They aim to ensure an affordable and reliable energy supply to households and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Queensland Government’s energy entities, which include electricity generators (CS Energy and Stanwell), electricity transmission operators (Powerlink), electricity distributors (Energex and Ergon) and retailers (Ergon Energy Queensland).

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland’s transport sector work together to create an integrated transport network, connecting Queensland’s people and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the seven state-owned entities in the sector. These include the Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Rail, Cross River Rail Delivery Authority, and the four port entities. We also plan to examine major developments such as the Smart Ticketing Project and Transport Delivery Contracts.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

State and local government owned water entities provide water throughout Queensland, to households, agriculture, mining, electricity generation, tourism, and manufacturing industries. Our report summarises our financial audit results of Seqwater, Sunwater, Queensland Urban Utilities, Unitywater, Gladstone Area Water Board and Mount Isa Water Board.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

This report to parliament on major projects will draw together our financial and performance insights and provide the status of major infrastructure projects of the state and local governments. We will also provide data and analysis of the planning, coordination, and delivery of the state’s capital program.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Entities report to us their progress in implementing recommendations from our performance audit reports. In 202122, we will report on the status of recommendations made across the three years 201516 to 201718. This report will highlight common themes across these reports and provide insights into the progress reported by entities. In subsequent years, we will cover any outstanding recommendations, and any additional recommendations in the next year’s reports to parliament. For example, in 202223, we will report on the status of recommendations made between 201516 to 201819.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

2023–24

Effective audit committees can catalyse better governance in an entity. They help entities become more efficient, effective, and economical, and promote accountability, integrity and transparency. Following our report Effectiveness of audit committees in state government entities (Report 2: 202021), this audit will examine the effectiveness of local government (council) audit committees.

Who we might audit
  • Local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Mining is a critical component of Queensland’s economy. The state has diverse reserves of coal, minerals, and petroleum and coal seam gas. The environmental, economic, and social impacts of mining activities can be significant. This audit will examine how effective and efficient state government entities are in granting mining approvals. It will examine whether relevant public sector entities assess mining applications against relevant eligibility criteria and in a timely manner.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Resources
  • Department of Environment and Science.
Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Childhood obesity can have a range of adverse consequences including social discrimination, poor self-esteem, depression, and childhood type 2 diabetes. This audit will examine whether state government entities are effectively reducing childhood obesity.

Who we might audit
  • Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Health
  • Health and Wellbeing Queensland.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised