You can contribute to audits in Queensland by:

When suggesting new topics or raising issues, they need to relate to public sector entities or money being spent on public services.

Any contribution can be made confidentially and is protected by legislation. Your personal information is protected by the Information Privacy Act 2009 and the content within your submission will only be disclosed to other agencies for the purposes defined under section 53 of the Auditor-General Act 2009. 

Any personal details that you choose to provide will not be given to any other organisations or agencies.

2021–22

This audit will set out information on how the Department of Education is achieving its objectives to securely and reliably connect learners, teachers and staff to the digital resources and online content that they need. The focus will be on two pillars of the department’s strategy—enhanced collaboration and digital enablement.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is achieving its objectives in implementing a digital strategy to support learning in a digital world.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Tabled
20 July 2021

This follow-up audit will assess whether the Department of Health and hospital and health services have effectively implemented the recommendations made in Emergency department performance reporting (Report 3: 2014–15) and are effectively managing emergency length of stay (ELOS) and patient off stretcher time (POST) performance.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
14 September 2021

State and local government owned water entities provide water throughout Queensland, to households, agriculture, mining, electricity generation, tourism, and manufacturing industries. Our report summarises our financial audit results of Seqwater, Sunwater, Queensland Urban Utilities, Unitywater, Gladstone Area Water Board and Mount Isa Water Board. We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Tabled
10 November 2021

QAO has developed a new process for entities to efficiently and effectively self-assess how they are tracking in implementing the recommendations QAO makes in its performance audit reports to parliament. The results of the self-assessments will be included in a new report to parliament, the first of which is titled Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021.

Who we might audit

The Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021 will include the progress entities have made against QAO recommendations in our reports tabled between 2015–16 and 2017–18. This entails 30 reports, containing 203 performance audit recommendations, made to 54 entities.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
17 November 2021

The Queensland Government is committed to increasing its use of renewable energy and reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. This audit will examine how the state is managing Queensland’s planned transition to 50 per cent renewable energy by 2030. It will consider the energy initiatives the state government has implemented and the initiatives it plans to implement in the coming years. It will also consider the risks to achieving the 50 per cent target.

Audit Objective

This report will identify the facts relating to the government’s framework for transitioning to meet its renewable energy targets.

Who we might audit

Department of Energy and Public Works

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
25 November 2021

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries administers the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001. This legislation gives the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) Queensland powers to deliver animal welfare services. This audit will examine the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries’ engagement with RSPCA Queensland, and how well the department manages that engagement.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries' agreement for RSPCA Queensland to deliver services and exercise powers under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001, and how well the department manages those arrangements.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Tabled
30 November 2021

In Queensland, corporations that are owned by the state government generate, transmit, and distribute most of the state’s electricity needs. They aim to ensure an affordable and reliable energy supply to households and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Queensland Government’s energy entities, which include electricity generators (CS Energy and Stanwell), electricity transmission operators (Powerlink), electricity distributors (Energex and Ergon) and retailers (Ergon Energy Queensland). We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
2 December 2021

Long waiting times and inappropriate referrals to specialist medical appointments can contribute to sub-optimal outcomes for patients. This audit will examine whether the Department of Health has improved access to specialist outpatient services, including the effectiveness of strategies to increase services where needed, improve equity of access, and ensure patients are seen within recommended times.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
6 December 2021

The owner of a dam is responsible for its safety. Having a dam safety management program in place can minimise the risk of its failure, and the potential impact on human life and property. This audit will provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Audit Objective

The objective of the audit is to provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Tabled
8 December 2021

The entities in Queensland’s transport sector work together to create an integrated transport network, connecting Queensland’s people and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the seven state-owned entities in the sector. These include the Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Rail, Cross River Rail Delivery Authority, and the four port entities. We also plan to examine major developments such as the Smart Ticketing Project and Transport Delivery Contracts.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
10 December 2021

The Queensland Government established the Queensland Future Fund to reduce state debt. It is a special purpose fund with an estimated funding of $5.6 billion. This audit will examine how the Queensland Future Fund is being established.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Treasury.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
13 December 2021

The entities in Queensland's health sector work together to provide a range of healthcare services to Queenslanders and support the wellbeing of Queensland communities. They are currently also at the frontline of the battle against COVID‑19, which brought a wide range of impacts across the sector. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Department of Health and the 16 hospital and health services.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
16 December 2021

Each year, the Treasurer prepares consolidated state government financial statements. This report analyses the key financial transactions and balances impacting on the Queensland Government’s financial performance and position. The report also considers the key developments and challenges that may impact on the state’s finances in future financial years.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
8 March 2022

Most public sector entities prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Our report summarises the results of audits of Queensland state government entities for each year of this plan, including the 22 government departments. Our 2021 report will analyse the impacts of recent machinery of government changes. We will also follow up audit issues we reported in previous years, including those raised in our report Awarding of sports grants (Report 6: 2020–21).

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
11 April 2022

Queensland's local governments are the first line of connection to communities; providing Queenslanders with a wide range of services such as roads, water and waste, libraries, and parks. Our report summarises the audit results of Queensland’s 77 local government entities (councils) and the entities they control.

This report will also include the results of our assessment of councils’ financial statement preparation processes. We will also include focus areas on councils’ use of discretionary funds, managing conflicts of interest, processing and approving development applications, accounting for damage to assets from natural disasters, and continued impacts of COVID‑19.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Tabled
11 May 2022

Contracting in many public sector entities involves a significant level of expenditure and resources. The Queensland Government expects to spend $56 billion in infrastructure (such as roads, hospitals, schools, Cross River Rail, and cruise terminals) over the four years to 2024. This audit will examine how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure. We will assess contract management frameworks, guidelines and processes, and how effectively entities apply them.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Education
  • Queensland Corrective Services. 
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Tabled
17 May 2022

Government boards play an integral role in setting the strategic direction for an entity, ensuring corporate compliance and management accountability. In many cases, they are responsible for spending taxpayers' money and the custody and control of public assets. This audit will examine the processes entities use to appoint and renew government boards. It will evaluate the current guidelines, and will consider the makeup, diversity, and skill sets of board members.

Audit Objective

The objective of this audit is to assess the processes agencies use to appoint and renew government boards.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads
  • Department of Employment, Small Business and Training
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
19 May 2022

The Queensland Government has invested more than $8 billion to respond to the economic, health and societal impacts of COVID‑19. This audit will examine the impact and effectiveness of public spending during COVID‑19 in maintaining key industries (such as mining, agriculture and tourism) and local economies. The audit may consider whether the funding was targeted to the areas with the most need, and whether spending has reduced or mitigated disruption to the economy.

This audit was previously titled 'COVID-19 economic stimulus spending: early impact'.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Apr-Jun 2022
Contributions closed

Efficient government services are a central part of our vision of better public services for Queenslanders. This audit will examine government administrative spending and how data is being used to inform the identification of opportunities for savings.

Who we might audit
  • Selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
To be tabled
Anticipated tabling: May 2022

Entities within Queensland's education sector help individuals transition through all stages of schooling, providing knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. Our report summarises our financial audit results for education sector entities, including the Department of Education; the Department of Employment, Small Business and Training; TAFE Queensland; the eight grammar schools; and the seven public universities. We will focus our controls testing on procurement in the 2021 report.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
To be tabled
Anticipated tabling: Jun 2022

This report to parliament on major projects will draw together our financial and performance insights and provide the status of major infrastructure projects of the state and local governments. We will also provide data and analysis of the planning, coordination, and delivery of the state’s capital program.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Apr-Jun 2022
Contributions closed

The Queensland Government is investing $1.6 billion in the Social Housing Construction Jobs Program during 2017–2027. This includes a commitment to deliver 2,972 new social housing homes across the state in the first five years. This audit will examine whether social housing programs are effectively and efficiently meeting the needs of vulnerable Queenslanders.

Contributions to this audit will close on 25 March 2022. 

Who we might audit
  • Department of Communities, Housing and Digital Economy.
Parliamentary Committee
Community Support and Services Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul-Sep 2022
Contributions closed

Each year, the Queensland Government provides over $11 billion in financial assistance to councils and community organisations with grants, concessions, benefit payments and community service obligations that provide essential services for their local communities. This report will provide insights on where Queensland government grants go and assess the maturity of the systems and processes that ensure accountability and value for money.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland government departments
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Apr–Jun 2022
Contributions closed

2022–23

Cyber attacks result in significant cost and disruption to the delivery of critical public services. The Australian Cyber Security Centre reported that in 2020–21 there was an increase of 13 per cent in cyber crime reports, with organisations self-reporting a loss of $33 billion. Of the cyber security incidents, one-third of the affected entities are associated with Australia’s critical infrastructure.

Audit Objective

This audit will provide insights and lessons learned on entities’ preparedness to respond to and recover from cyber attacks.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Housing, Communities and Digital Economy
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Community Support and Services Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Change is impacting the context in which government delivers services. Digital transformation is driving the need for more tailored, data-informed solutions, and citizen expectations of government services and employee expectations are changing, demanding different workforce models. These changes to the operating environment create challenges for government and the responsiveness of its services is more critical than ever. Recent crisis management experiences through the 2019–20 bushfire season and the COVID-19 pandemic have reinforced the need for the public sector to have a flexible and agile workforce that better responds to dynamic changes.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine the effectiveness of the Queensland public sector’s workforce planning to support an agile and flexible workforce that can meet changing needs and government priorities.

Who we might audit

Public Service Commission and 20 core departments.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sept 2022

First Nations peoples, including children, face considerable disadvantages in health and wellbeing compared to non-First Nations peoples. The life expectancy gap between First Nations peoples and non-First Nations peoples is currently estimated at 7.8 years for males and 6.7 years for females. The 3 leading drivers of this gap are cardiovascular disease, cancers, and diabetes.

The Department of Health’s Strategic Plan 2021–2025 has a key focus on the health of First Nations peoples, with one of the primary objectives to advance health equity.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of Queensland Health’s and other public sector entities’ strategies to improve health outcomes for First Nations peoples.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Seniors, Disability Services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Ecotourism is defined as responsible travel that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of local people, and educates travellers. Queensland provides many visitors with high-quality ecotourism experiences.

For the year ending June 2020, Queensland had more than 22 million domestic and international visitors, contributing $23 billion to the state’s economy. Since March 2020, COVID-19 significantly impacted the tourism industry, with its economic contribution decreasing by 20 per cent.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether the state’s tourism and environmental entities are effectively developing sustainable ecotourism in Queensland.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Environment and Science
  • Department of Tourism, Innovation and Sport
  • Tourism and Events Queensland
  • selected local governments.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sep 2022

The demand on the Queensland Police Service continues to increase, with more diversified services placing additional stress on resources. These services include support for COVID-19, mental health, domestic violence, drugs, and incident response.

Population growth and major events such as the 2032 Brisbane Olympic and Paralympic Games will also continue to impact resources.

Over time, these factors can impact allowances and accrued leave, which effects how the police service deploys its resources.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Police Service deploys its resources to maximise public safety and meet service demands within the community.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Domestic violence is a complex and growing problem that reaches every corner of our society. It requires public sector entities, non-government organisations, businesses, and communities to work together effectively to provide integrated and responsive services to protect people from domestic and family violence.

This is an amalgamation of 2 previously scheduled audits on domestic and family violence matters. We have combined these audits to avoid duplication, reduce impact on entities, and deliver a more complete and concise report to parliament.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine the governance arrangements of domestic and family violence in Queensland. It will also examine how effectively public sector entities keep people safe from domestic and family violence and how effectively they rehabilitate perpetrators to reduce the re-occurrence of violence.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul-Sept 2022
Contributions closed

The government can help shape the future of the state and the community. Efficient and effective cross department and local government coordination and planning can ensure the right infrastructure investments are made where needed and at the right time. This includes ensuring that economic, social, and environmental factors are appropriately considered.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how efficiently and effectively the government undertakes planning to inform infrastructure investments.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • selected public sector entities
  • selected local governments.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Invasive species, including animals, plants, and diseases, have significant economic, environmental, and social impacts. They place considerable pressure on native wildlife and in some instances have contributed to the decline or extinction of native species.

The Queensland Invasive Plants and Animals Strategy 2019–2024 contains 6 objectives with associated strategic actions for combating invasive species.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how effectively state government entities are managing invasive species.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (including Biosecurity Queensland)
  • Department of Environment and Science
  • selected local governments.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Local governments – councils – are responsible for maintaining and renewing an asset portfolio of around $112 billion, which they use to deliver community services.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess if councils are effectively managing their infrastructure assets to maximise service potential, while minimising the total cost of owning these assets. The audit may consider whether the state government provides councils with appropriate guidance, advice, and templates to use.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • local local governments.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sep 2022

Australia is home to between 600,000 to 700,000 species of wildlife, many of which are found nowhere else in the world. Queensland is home to more than 50 per cent of Australia’s native species. Changes to landscape and habitats particularly from human activity has put some of these unique wildlife at risk, causing many species of plants and animals to become extinct.

The Nature Conservation Act 1992 defines threatened wildlife as extinct, extinct in the wild, critically endangered, endangered, and vulnerable. In Queensland, there are currently 1,026 species listed as threatened (243 animals and 783 plants). A significant number of these species are listed as threatened nationally under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The Department of Environment and Science (the department) has a lead role in coordinating work to conserve threatened species. In November 2018, the Auditor-General issued the report Conserving threatened species (Report 7: 201819) on a performance audit for the department on the management of conservation of threatened species. The 2018 audit made 7 recommendations that included improvements and changes to legislation, nomination and listing processes, development of an integrated and comprehensive conservation strategy, and monitoring and reporting of threatened species.

Audit Objective

This follow-up audit will examine the status and effectiveness of the implementation of the 7 recommendations resulting from the original report tabled in November 2018.

Who we might audit

Department of Environment and Science

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sep 2022
Contributions closed

Regional areas within Queensland account for 1.7 million square kilometres across the state. They are home to a network of regional economies and have strengths in industries including agriculture, resources, and tourism. Influences such as the prospect of employment, access to affordable housing, health, education, financial and other social aspects all impact on each region’s ability to remain prosperous and sustainable.

Given the importance of ports and water supply in Queensland’s regions, this report will include an analysis of the port and water entities’ financial performance and position and provide insights into how regional Queensland communities are remaining prosperous and sustainable.

We will consider how regional areas support economic activity and sustainable communities throughout Queensland. The report will analyse data on state and local government service delivery and support for Queensland’s regions, and consider other regional growth and sustainability measures, including employment and economic activity.

Each year our reports will build on focus areas from our previous reports on Queensland’s regions.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The government holds significant investments that may be used to meet the state’s long-term liabilities or to fund future government initiatives. An example is the Queensland Future Fund that was established to offset state debt.

This report to parliament will examine how the Queensland Government is managing its debt and investments and will include insights into what the Queensland Government has invested in and how the investments are managed. It will examine the main transactions (including significant investments made or changes to investments) and the performance of these investments including cash flows to general government.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Most public sector entities prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Our report summarises the results of audits of Queensland state government entities, including government departments.

This report will analyse the Queensland Government’s financial performance and position and highlight the main transactions for the year. In 2022, our rotational focus on internal controls will include an assessment of change management processes at departments following the machinery of government changes in 2017 and 2020.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Queensland's local governments – councils – are the first line of connection to communities; providing Queenslanders with a wide range of services such as roads, water and waste, libraries, and parks. This report summarises the audit results of Queensland’s 77 councils and the entities they control.

The report will also include the results of our assessment of councils’ financial statement preparation processes, internal controls and financial sustainability. In 2022, our rotational focus on internal controls will include an assessment of procure-to-pay processes at several councils.

Our financial sustainability assessments will consider the ratios published by the Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning, as well as what makes a sustainable community in Queensland’s regions. Each year our report will build on focus areas from our previous local government reports.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Entities within Queensland's education sector help individuals transition through all stages of schooling, providing knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce.

This report analyses the education entities’ financial performance and position. It will provide insights into education entities’ ongoing responses to COVID-19 and in meeting the educational requirements and needs of population growth in Queensland’s regions. Our rotational focus on internal controls will also include an assessment of risk management processes at universities in 2022–23.

Each year our reports will build on any focus areas from our previous education reports.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland's health sector work together to provide a range of healthcare services to Queenslanders and support the wellbeing of Queensland communities.

This report analyses the health entities’ financial performance and position and includes assessments of their financial statement preparation processes, internal controls, and financial sustainability.

It will provide insights into how the health system is responding to increased demand due to COVID-19, an increasing and ageing population, and changing health needs.

Each year our reports will build on any focus areas from previous health reports.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

In Queensland, 5 government owned corporations generate, transmit, and distribute most of the state’s electricity needs. They aim to ensure an affordable and reliable energy supply to households and businesses.

This report analyses the energy entities’ financial performance and position and provides insights into the transition to renewable energy, and the impact on energy entities’ profit and security of energy supply.

Each year our reports will build on any focus areas from our previous energy reports.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

This report will provide insights into the status of major infrastructure projects of the state and local governments across Queensland’s regions. We will also provide data and analysis of the planning, coordination, and delivery of the state’s capital program.

Major projects likely to be included in the reports include Cross River Rail, Gold Coast Light Rail Stages 3 and 4, Brisbane Metro, upgrades to the Bruce Highway and projects associated with delivering the 2032 Brisbane Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Each year our reports will build on any focus areas from our previous major projects reports.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Entities report to us on their progress in implementing recommendations from our performance audit reports. Each report will highlight common themes across recommendations and provide insights into the progress reported by entities.

In 2022–23, our report will include the status of recommendations we made to entities in reports tabled in 2018–19 and 2019–20.

Each year our reports will also provide a further update on outstanding recommendations (recommendations not implemented or partially implemented) identified in our previous reports.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

2023–24

Offending by young people has been an increasing community concern over recent years. Youth offending can stem from a range of complex social problems such as family dysfunction, poor educational outcomes, unemployment, and substance abuse.

Queensland Parliament’s Community Support and Services Committee noted in its report on the 2020–21 budget estimates that the government is providing a total of $472.6 million additional funding over 5 years to the Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs. This includes support to young people and measures to reduce youth offending.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether youth justice initiatives are effective in helping young people better connect with the community and in reducing their risk of reoffending.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs
  • Queensland Police Service
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General.
Parliamentary Committee
Community Support and Services Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Each year the government prepares a state budget identifying estimated revenues and expenses over the next 4 years. The budget also outlines how the government’s fiscal objectives and strategies will support key initiatives and longer-term objectives identified in key documents such as Queensland’s COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan and the Savings and Debt Plan.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine how the framework for preparing the state budget supports the government’s identified fiscal principles and the objectives and measures identified in key economic plans.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Treasury
  • selected departments.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Queensland’s education environment has been impacted by the rapid increase in population from interstate migration, vaccine mandates, and fewer students choosing to study teaching at university. These factors may lead to a shortage of teachers in schools in the coming years.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine how public sector entities attract and support teachers during their own education pathways, and how the Department of Education supports teachers throughout their careers to improve retention.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education
  • Queensland College of Teachers
  • selected public universities.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Cyber safety is important for protecting students from online bullying and from online predators. In February 2021, the Australian Government’s e-Safety Commissioner reported that 44 per cent of teenagers had a negative online experience in the 6 months to September 2020. This included being contacted by a stranger, receiving inappropriate content, and receiving online threats or abuse.

In February 2018, the Queensland Anti-Cyberbullying Taskforce made 29 recommendations to address cyberbullying. Subsequently (November 2020), the Department of Education released its Online safety in Queensland public schools document and online courses for students in years 3 to 12.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is effectively supporting schools to help protect students in their online activities.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education, including selected public schools.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

In Queensland, one in 4 children (24 per cent) aged between 5 to 17 years is either overweight (16 per cent) or obese (8 per cent). Obesity in Queensland children is the second highest in the country and has increased from 7.2 per cent in 2014–15 to 8.1 per cent in 2020.

Childhood obesity can have a range of adverse consequences including social discrimination, poor self-esteem, depression, and childhood type 2 diabetes. This can also have an effect in later years with health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

The My health, Queensland’s future: Advancing health 2026 has a target to reduce childhood obesity by 10 per cent by 2026. It aims to do this through 5 principles –sustainability, compassion, inclusion, excellence, and empowerment.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether state government entities are effectively reducing the rising trends of childhood obesity.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs
  • Health and Wellbeing Queensland.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Gambling problems can have severe personal consequences, including financial hardship, emotional difficulties, social impacts, employment difficulties and legal problems. Gambling expenditure by Queenslanders has increased by 27 per cent from $3.0 billion in 2009–10 to $3.8 billion in 2019–20.

The Gambling harm minimisation plan for Queensland 2021–25 aims to address and minimise gambling-related harm and its impact on the wider community. Additionally, the Queensland Parliament passed the Criminal Code (Consent and Mistake of Fact) and Other Legislation Amendment Act 2021 in April 2021 to deliver stronger consumer protection for Queenslanders gambling online.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the state government’s strategies in reducing the risk of harm to the community from gambling.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Many public sector entities rely on the dedication of tens of thousands of volunteers. Volunteers connect people and provide critical services. In recent years, volunteers have also been pivotal with the Care Army assisting during COVID-19, and the volunteer rural fire brigades assisting during the 2019 bush fires.

The Queensland Plan’s community target is to have the highest rates of volunteering and community participation in Australia.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess whether the government is effectively managing its volunteer workforce (for example, the State Emergency Service). The audit may consider issues such as workforce planning, recruitment, training, risk management, and resource allocation.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
  • selected local councils
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Audit committees are an important part of governance frameworks. Effective audit committees can catalyse better governance in entities. They help entities become more efficient, effective, and economical, and promote accountability, integrity, and transparency.

Following our report Effectiveness of audit committees in state government entities (Report 2: 2020–21), this audit will provide insights into the effectiveness of local government audit committees.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • selected local governments.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised