You can contribute to audits in Queensland by:

When suggesting new topics or raising issues, they need to relate to public sector entities or money being spent on public services.

Any contribution can be made confidentially and is protected by legislation. Your personal information is protected by the Information Privacy Act 2009 and the content within your submission will only be disclosed to other agencies for the purposes defined under section 53 of the Auditor-General Act 2009. 

Any personal details that you choose to provide will not be given to any other organisations or agencies.

2020–21

In response to the Queensland Child Protection Commission of Inquiry, the Queensland Government is implementing a new child and family support system over the next 10 years. It is intended to have a greater focus on supporting families in providing a safe and secure home for their children.

This response reinforces that parents and families are responsible for the care and safety of their children, with the government's role being to support parents and families by providing the right services at the right time for those in need. Implementing the reforms will require a fundamental shift in the way government agencies, child safety professionals, and community organisations work with vulnerable families, and with each other.

The Queensland Government is investing $406 million over five years from 2014–15 to 2018–19 to better support the state’s most vulnerable families and children.
 

Audit Objective

The objective of this audit is to assess how effectively Queensland government agencies work together for the safety and wellbeing of Queensland children.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women
  • Queensland Family and Child Commission
  • Queensland Police Service
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Health
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Office of the Public Guardian.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
4 August 2020

Audit committees are an important part of the governance framework of public sector entities. They are mandatory for all government departments and are encouraged for other public sector entities.

Audit committees provide independent assurance and advice to accountable officers and boards. To provide assurance they require:

  • a documented charter that identifies the committee's responsibilities
  • individuals with the right combination of skills and experience
  • a sound working relationship with the accountable office or board and the entity.

Audit committees are also responsible for monitoring the implementation of recommendations made by audits and other review activities and ensuring the coverage of audits is aligned with the entity’s risks.

Purpose of the report

This report will assess the effectiveness of the audit committees of public sector entities.

Who we might audit
  • A selection of state government departments and statutory bodies.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
8 September 2020

Purpose of the report

This report will provide a broad outline of government's activities in response to COVID-19, including estimated costs of those activities. It is not a performance audit and will not assess the effectiveness of the government's response activities.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
22 September 2020

Purpose of the report

This report will identify the facts relating to the S/4 HANA implementation and the subsequent actions the department has undertaken. 

The areas we will focus on are:

  • key processes informing the go-live decision
  • the outcomes of the project and the impacts on the Queensland Health sector
  • the projects taken to stabilise the system and the continuing projects to manage it.
Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • A sample of hospital and health services
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
23 September 2020

The Queensland guardianship system protects the rights and interests of individuals who do not have the capacity to make decisions for themselves. It aims to provide adequate and appropriate support for individuals to make decisions, with as much autonomy as possible. The law assumes an adult has the capacity to make a decision, unless evidence proves otherwise. Capacity is defined as an individual’s ability to:

  • understand the nature and effect of decisions
  • freely and voluntarily make decisions
  • communicate those decisions in some way.

It is important to assess the level of capacity in the context of the decision that the individual is making. While an individual’s decision-making capacity may be impaired, they may still be able to make some decisions for themselves. Therefore, depending on the level of impairment in the situation, the individual may require someone to make the decision on their behalf, or may only require support to make the decision themselves. Delivering appropriate social, legal, health and financial outcomes for these adults is important for their quality of life. 

The Office of the Public Guardian, the Office of the Public Trustee and the Office of the Public Advocate are responsible for providing an effective and integrated service that supports and promotes the rights of adults with impaired decision-making capacity.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how well Queensland’s guardianship system manage complaints and investigations to improve the protection of people with impaired decision-making capacity.

Who we might audit
  • Public Trustee Queensland
  • Office of the Public Guardian.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
24 September 2020

Purpose of the report

This report will identify the facts relating to the awarding of sports grants within Queensland during 1 July 2017–29 February 2020.

The areas we will focus on are:

  • What is the process for awarding sports grants?
  • Has the minister or the department exercised discretion in the awarding of sports grants?
  • What is the value and location of monies expended through sports grants?
Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
29 September 2020

Purpose of the report

This report will highlight recurring risks and issues that entities need to manage and will share learnings with the wider public sector. It is not a performance audit or any other form of assurance of the program and projects.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
30 September 2020

Community safety is improved by the enforcement of strict controls on the possession of firearms. In 1996, the Commonwealth of Australia and states and territories established the National Firearms Agreement as a result of the Port Arthur massacre. It sets out minimum requirements in relation to the regulation of firearms. 

In Queensland, people who want to possess a firearm must apply for and be granted both a firearms license and a ‘Permit to Acquire’. The Queensland Police Service Weapons Licensing unit is responsible for administering all aspects of the Weapons Act 1990, Weapons Regulations 2016 and Weapons Categories Regulations 1997. This includes the issue and renewal of all licenses, permits and exemptions, and the maintenance of the commissioner’s firearms register. Ensuring license holders are aware of and comply with their obligations to maintain appropriate security of their firearms is crucial to:

  • effective gun control and regulation
  • reducing gun thefts.

The Queensland Police Service reported that there were 844,129 firearms registered in Queensland as of 3 June 2018. Between 2014 and 2017, 2,599 firearms were reported stolen.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how effectively the Queensland Police Service regulates firearms in Queensland to ensure community safety.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Tabled
27 November 2020

In Queensland, water is primarily used by households, agriculture, mining, electricity generation, tourism, and manufacturing industries. Queensland’s state and local government owned water entities provide water throughout the state, and comprise bulk water suppliers, distributor-retailers, local governments, and smaller water boards.

Seqwater sells treated bulk water to local council regions within South East Queensland. This water is sold either directly to councils or through Distributor-Retailer Authorities (Unitywater and Queensland Urban Utilities).

Outside of South East Queensland, SunWater operates much of the bulk water infrastructure that supplies irrigators and industrial customers. For retail customers, water is sourced, treated and distributed by local government owned infrastructure (water boards).

Audit Objective

This audit summarises our financial audit results of state and local government owned water entities, and two controlled entities for 2019–20.

Who we might audit

The six main state and local government owned water entities, and two controlled entities. These included Seqwater, SunWater, Gladstone Area Water Board, Mount Isa Water Board, Queensland Urban Utilities, and Unitywater.

Audit status
Tabled
28 January 2021

Queensland’s seven transport entities play a critical role in delivering a single integrated transport network that connects Queensland’s people, and facilitates a growing economy.

Direction and oversight of the state’s transport sector is provided by the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR). The department’s primary role is to plan, manage and deliver Queensland’s integrated transport environment to achieve sustainable transport solutions for road, rail, air and sea. DTMR also provides oversight of Queensland Rail Group and Port entities. Queensland Rail Group is Queensland’s railway manager and operator, servicing the passenger, tourism, resources and freight customer markets. The port entities are part of Queensland’s network of 19 ports, which ranges from small community ports to large coal export terminals and a capital city multi-cargo port.

Audit Objective

This audit summarises our financial audit results of seven state-owned transport entities for 2019–20.

Who we might audit

Seven state-owned transport entities including the Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Rail Group, and Government Owned Corporations.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Tabled
2 February 2021

In Queensland, most electricity is generated, transmitted, and distributed by state government-owned corporations and controlled entities. These include CS Energy, Stanwell, Powerlink, Energy Queensland, Ergon Energy, and 30 subsidiaries.

CS Energy and Stanwell are electricity generators. They produce electricity and sell into the National Electricity Market. Powerlink transmits electricity from generators to Energy Queensland, the distributor. Energy Queensland then distributes electricity from the transmission network to consumers. From there, electricity retailers purchase and sell electricity to households and businesses.

Audit Objective

This audit summarises our financial audit results of the Queensland Government’s energy entities for 2019–20.

Who we might audit

State government owned corporations and controlled energy entities. These included CS Energy, Stanwell, Powerlink, Energy Queensland, Ergon Energy, and 30 subsidiaries.

Audit status
Tabled
4 February 2021

Queensland health entities manage a large asset base and are funding innovative clinical care programs. This puts pressure on their financial sustainability. The Queensland public health sector includes the Department of Health and Queensland Ambulance Service, 16 hospital and health services, 13 hospital foundations, and three health statutory bodies and their controlled entities.

Audit Objective

This report summarises the results of our 2019–20 financial audits of the entities in the Queensland public health sector.

Who we might audit

Entities in the Queensland public health sector.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
9 February 2021

Most public sector entities, including departments, statutory bodies, and government owned corporations and the entities they control, prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Each year the Treasurer also prepares consolidated state government financial statements. The consolidated state government financial statements separately disclose transactions and balances for the general government sector and the total state sector.

Audit Objective

This report summarises the results of our financial audits for all entities that the Queensland Government owns or controls.

Who we might audit

All entities that the Queensland Government owns or controls.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
11 February 2021
Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of Queensland’s Office of the Public Guardian in supporting adults with a decision-making incapacity.

Who we might audit

Office of the Public Guardian

Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Tabled
16 February 2021

Most public sector entities, including departments, statutory bodies, and government owned corporations and the entities they control, prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Each year the Treasurer also prepares consolidated state government financial statements. The consolidated state government financial statements separately disclose transactions and balances for the general government sector and the total state sector.

Audit Objective

This report summarises the results of our financial audits for all entities that the Queensland Government owns or controls.

Who we might audit

All entities that the Queensland Government owns or controls.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
18 March 2021

Health service planning aims to improve service delivery to better meet the health needs of the population. It is future orientated and usually adopts a medium- to long-term (10–15 years) perspective. Good planning helps to make the best use of current and future health resources including funding, staff and infrastructure.

Delivering health services occurs in an increasingly dynamic environment with ever changing community expectations, government priorities and technological advances. Health budgets are constrained, yet there are ever-increasing pressures and demands on the public health system.

The Department of Health is responsible under the Hospital and Health Boards Act 2011 for statewide planning for the public health system. Hospital and Health Services must contribute to, and implement, statewide service plans that apply to them. They must also undertake further service planning that aligns with these plans.

Queensland Health’s strategy—Your health, Queensland's future: Advancing health 2026—identifies sustainability as one of five underpinning principles. This includes ensuring available resources are used efficiently and effectively for current and future generations.
 

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the Department of Health and the Hospital and Health Services in planning for sustainable health services. 

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • Selected Hospital and Health Services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Tabled
25 March 2021

Queensland's local governments are involved in a wide range of activities—from delivering key community services, such as roads, water, sewerage and waste treatment, to providing banking, retail, medical, cultural and recreational services.

Most local governments, and the entities that they control, produce annual financial statements. How useful these statements are depends on their quality and the time taken to produce them. Timely and accurate financial reporting is essential for effective decision-making, managing of public funds and assets, and the delivery of public accountability.

Audit Objective

This audit will summarise the results of our financial audits of the Queensland councils and the related entities they control that produced financial statements at 30 June.

Who we might audit

A selection of councils, to be advised.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Tabled
22 April 2021

Entities within the Queensland public education sector intend to deliver world class education and training services. Collectively, the sector aims to help individuals make positive transitions from early childhood through to all stages of schooling, providing them with the knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. This sector provides a variety of services and uses substantial resources to deliver these services.

Audit Objective

This audit will summarise the results of our financial audits of the Queensland public universities and their controlled entities, the Queensland grammar schools, and a small number of other education-specific entities with a financial year end of 31 December.

Who we might audit

Entities within the Queensland public education sector.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Tabled
27 May 2021

2021–22

The Queensland Government is committed to increasing its use of renewable energy and reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. This audit will examine how the state is managing Queensland’s planned transition to 50 per cent renewable energy by 2030. It will consider the energy initiatives the state government has implemented and the initiatives it plans to implement in the coming years. It will also consider the risks to achieving the 50 per cent target.

Audit Objective

This report will identify the facts relating to the government’s framework for transitioning to meet its renewable energy targets.

Who we might audit

Department of Energy and Public Works

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021

Contracting in many public sector entities involves a significant level of expenditure and resources. The Queensland Government expects to spend $56 billion in infrastructure (such as roads, hospitals, schools, Cross River Rail, and cruise terminals) over the four years to 2024. This audit will examine how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure. We will assess contract management frameworks, guidelines and processes, and how effectively entities apply them.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess how effectively public sector entities are managing the contracts for the delivery of major new infrastructure.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Education
  • Queensland Corrective Services. 
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021

This audit will set out information on how the Department of Education is achieving its objectives to securely and reliably connect learners, teachers and staff to the digital resources and online content that they need. The focus will be on two pillars of the department’s strategy—enhanced collaboration and digital enablement.

Audit Objective

This audit will examine whether the Department of Education is achieving its objectives in implementing a digital strategy to support learning in a digital world.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Education.
Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sep 2021
Contributions closed

Since 2015–16, the government has invested $554.75 million in a suite of domestic and family violence initiatives. This audit will examine the government’s progress in funding and implementing domestic and family violence initiatives and assess the effectiveness of its governance of the collective initiatives.

Audit Objective

The audit will report on the government's progress funding and implementing domestic and family violence initiatives and assess the effectiveness of its governance of the collective initiatives.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Children, Youth Justice and Multicultural Affairs
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021

The owner of a dam is responsible for its safety. Having a dam safety management program in place can minimise the risk of its failure, and the potential impact on human life and property. This audit will provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Audit Objective

The objective of the audit is to provide insights on the dam regulator’s framework for ensuring dams are managed safely.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021

The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries administers the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001. This legislation gives the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) Queensland powers to deliver animal welfare services. This audit will examine the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries’ engagement with RSPCA Queensland, and how well the department manages that engagement.

Audit Objective

This audit will assess the effectiveness of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries' agreement for RSPCA Queensland to deliver services and exercise powers under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001, and how well the department manages those arrangements.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021
Contributions closed

Government boards play an integral role in setting the strategic direction for an entity, ensuring corporate compliance and management accountability. In many cases, they are responsible for spending taxpayers' money and the custody and control of public assets. This audit will examine the processes entities use to appoint and renew government boards. It will evaluate the current guidelines, and will consider the makeup, diversity, and skill sets of board members.

Audit Objective

The objective of this audit is to assess the processes agencies use to appoint and renew government boards.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Transport and Main Roads
  • Department of Employment, Small Business and Training
  • Department of Energy and Public Works
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021

This follow-up audit will assess whether the Department of Health and hospital and health services have effectively implemented the recommendations made in Emergency department performance reporting (Report 3: 2014–15) and are effectively managing emergency length of stay (ELOS) and patient off stretcher time (POST) performance.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Jul–Sep 2021
Contributions closed

The Queensland Government has invested more than $8 billion to respond to the economic, health and societal impacts of COVID‑19. This audit will examine the impact and effectiveness of public spending during COVID‑19 in maintaining key industries (such as mining, agriculture and tourism) and local economies. The audit may consider whether the funding was targeted to the areas with the most need, and whether spending has reduced or mitigated disruption to the economy.

Who we might audit
  • Department of the Premier and Cabinet
  • Queensland Treasury
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Long waiting times and inappropriate referrals to specialist medical appointments can contribute to sub-optimal outcomes for patients. This audit will examine whether the Department of Health has improved access to specialist outpatient services, including the effectiveness of strategies to increase services where needed, improve equity of access, and ensure patients are seen within recommended times.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021

The Queensland Government is investing $1.6 billion in the Social Housing Construction Jobs Program during 2017–2027. This includes a commitment to deliver 2,972 new social housing homes across the state in the first five years. This audit will examine whether social housing programs are effectively and efficiently meeting the needs of vulnerable Queenslanders.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Communities, Housing and Digital Economy.
Parliamentary Committee
Community Support and Services Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Domestic violence is a complex and growing problem that reaches every corner of our society. In our previous audit we looked at the government’s initiatives, funding, and governance for family and domestic violence. This audit will follow on from our previous audit and will examine how effectively public sector entities keep people safe from domestic and family violence and how effectively they rehabilitate perpetrators to reduce the re-occurrence of violence. 

Who we might audit
  • Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Queensland Corrective Services
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: Oct-Dec 2021

The Queensland Government established the Queensland Future Fund to reduce state debt. It is a special purpose fund with an estimated funding of $5.6 billion. This audit will examine how the Queensland Future Fund is being established.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Treasury.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Efficient government services are a central part of our vision of better public services for Queenslanders. This audit will examine government administrative spending and will highlight patterns and trends in spending that may represent opportunities for savings. This audit may be followed by a wider review of government procurement.

Who we might audit
  • Selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Councils are responsible for maintaining and renewing an asset portfolio of around $112 billion, which they use to deliver community services. This audit will examine whether councils are effectively managing their infrastructure assets to maximise service potential, while minimising the total cost of owning these assets. The audit may consider whether the state government provides councils with appropriate guidance, advice, and templates to use.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Most public sector entities prepare annual financial statements and table these in parliament. Our report summarises the results of audits of Queensland state government entities for each year of this plan, including the 22 government departments. Our 2021 report will analyse the impacts of recent machinery of government changes. We will also follow up audit issues we reported in previous years, including those raised in our report Awarding of sports grants (Report 6: 2020–21).

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland's health sector work together to provide a range of healthcare services to Queenslanders and support the wellbeing of Queensland communities. They are currently also at the frontline of the battle against COVID‑19, which brought a wide range of impacts across the sector. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Department of Health and the 16 hospital and health services.

Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

The entities in Queensland’s transport sector work together to create an integrated transport network, connecting Queensland’s people and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the seven state-owned entities in the sector. These include the Department of Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Rail, Cross River Rail Delivery Authority, and the four port entities. We also plan to examine major developments such as the Smart Ticketing Project and Transport Delivery Contracts.

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Queensland's local governments are the first line of connection to communities; providing Queenslanders with a wide range of services such as roads, water and waste, libraries, and parks. Our report summarises the audit results of Queensland’s 77 local government entities (councils) and the entities they control.

This report will also include the results of our assessment of councils’ financial statement preparation processes. We will also include focus areas on councils’ use of discretionary funds, managing conflicts of interest, processing and approving development applications, accounting for damage to assets from natural disasters, and continued impacts of COVID‑19.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

In Queensland, corporations that are owned by the state government generate, transmit, and distribute most of the state’s electricity needs. They aim to ensure an affordable and reliable energy supply to households and businesses. Our report summarises our financial audit results of the Queensland Government’s energy entities, which include electricity generators (CS Energy and Stanwell), electricity transmission operators (Powerlink), electricity distributors (Energex and Ergon) and retailers (Ergon Energy Queensland). We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Entities within Queensland's education sector help individuals transition through all stages of schooling, providing knowledge and skills to prepare them for future education, training, or the workforce. Our report summarises our financial audit results for education sector entities, including the Department of Education; the Department of Employment, Small Business and Training; TAFE Queensland; the eight grammar schools; and the seven public universities. We will focus our controls testing on procurement in the 2021 report.

Parliamentary Committee
Education, Employment and Training Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

State and local government owned water entities provide water throughout Queensland, to households, agriculture, mining, electricity generation, tourism, and manufacturing industries. Our report summarises our financial audit results of Seqwater, Sunwater, Queensland Urban Utilities, Unitywater, Gladstone Area Water Board and Mount Isa Water Board. We will focus our controls testing on governance, monitoring and culture in the 2021 report. 

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

Each year, the Treasurer prepares consolidated state government financial statements. This report analyses the key financial transactions and balances impacting on the Queensland Government’s financial performance and position. The report also considers the key developments and challenges that may impact on the state’s finances in future financial years.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

This report to parliament on major projects will draw together our financial and performance insights and provide the status of major infrastructure projects of the state and local governments. We will also provide data and analysis of the planning, coordination, and delivery of the state’s capital program.

Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised
Contributions closed

QAO has developed a new process for entities to efficiently and effectively self-assess how they are tracking in implementing the recommendations QAO makes in its performance audit reports to parliament. The results of the self-assessments will be included in a new report to parliament, the first of which is titled Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021.

Who we might audit

The Status of Auditor-General recommendations 2021 will include the progress entities have made against QAO recommendations in our reports tabled between 2015–16 and 2017–18. This entails 30 reports, containing 203 performance audit recommendations, made to 54 entities.

Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
In progress
Anticipated tabling: July-Sept 2021
Contributions closed

2022–23

Deploying police resources efficiently and effectively means using the most appropriate types and number of resources in the right place at the right time. This audit will examine how efficiently and effectively the Queensland Police Service deploys its resources to maximise public safety.

Who we might audit
  • Queensland Police Service.
Parliamentary Committee
Legal Affairs and Safety Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Regions outside of South East Queensland account for approximately one-third of the state’s total economic output and around 28 per cent of the population. They are critical to Queensland’s economy and future. This audit will examine the Queensland Government’s effectiveness in progressing the goals for strong and prosperous regions in its Queensland Plan.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Queensland spends over $930 million annually on state-funded mental health services. Each year, one in five adults experiences a mental disorder. This audit will examine how well Queensland’s state-funded mental health services are meeting the care needs of Queenslanders. The audit may consider the transition of patients from hospital care into community-based care, and the effective alignment of mental health services with those delivered through the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Health
  • selected hospital and health services
  • Queensland Mental Health Commission.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

In 2020–21, the Queensland Government plans to spend $14.8 billion to drive the state’s largest infrastructure program in over a decade. This audit will examine how effectively and efficiently public sector entities plan and deliver key infrastructure projects.

Who we might audit
  • Department of State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
State Development and Regional Industries Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

This audit will examine how different public sector entities managed their workforces during COVID‑19. It will consider how agencies rapidly deployed staff to areas with urgent need. It will also consider the state government’s overall mobility framework, frontline deployment, employee mobilisation, and internal recruitment to temporarily fill non-frontline roles.

Who we might audit
  • Public Service Commission
  • selected public sector entities.
Parliamentary Committee
Economics and Governance Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

Our world heritage sites are a cornerstone of the tourism industry, with some attracting increasing numbers of visitors. Sustainably managing the tourism and environmental priorities of these sites can present significant challenges for the public sector. This audit will how effectively the state’s tourism and environmental entities are managing Queensland’s world heritage listed sites.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Environment and Science
  • Department of Tourism, Innovation and Sport
  • Tourism and Events Queensland
  • local councils.
Parliamentary Committee
Health and Environment Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised

The Powering Queensland Plan sets out the Queensland Government's strategy to guide the state through the short-term and long-term challenges facing Australia's energy markets. The government is investing $1.16 billion to ensure Queenslanders can access an affordable and secure supply of energy. This audit will examine whether the state is effectively implementing the Powering Queensland Plan to ensure Queenslanders can access an affordable, secure, and clean supply of energy.

Who we might audit
  • Department of Energy and Public Works.
Parliamentary Committee
Transport and Resources Committee
Audit status
Planned
Anticipated tabling: to be advised